CCTV

Closed-circuit television (CCTV), is the use of video cameras to transmit a closed signal to a specific place, on a limited set of monitors. Although CCTV is most often applied to such areas that may need monitoring such as banks, casinos, airports, military installations, and convenience stores.

In industrial plants, CCTV equipment may be used to observe parts of a process from a central control room, for example when the environment is not suitable for humans. CCTV systems may operate continuously or only as required to monitor a particular event. A more advanced form of CCTV, utilizing digital video recorders[3] (DVRs), provides recording for possibly many years, with a variety of quality and performance options and extra features (such as motion detection and email alerts). More recently, decentralized IP cameras, some equipped with megapixel sensors, support recording directly to network-attached storage devices, or internal flash for completely stand-alone operation. Surveillance of the public using CCTV is particularly common in many areas around the world.

  •  Home Security
  • Crime prevention 
  • Control of retail
  • Traffic monitoring
  • Transport safety
  • Industrial processes

Why do you need CCTV?

60% of businesses in the UK are effected by crime each year plus hundreds of thousands of burglaries, and this costs a staggering £5bn, with a staggering 10% of business lost as a consequence of crime.

CCTV is a very powerful tool in the fight against crime. Not only does CCTV provide a fantastic visual deterrent – footage can be used to provide evidence against anti-social behaviour, theft, vandalism and burglary – saving you thousands in the long run.

  • CCTV helps to deter thieves
  • View remote locations, including multiple locations at once
  • Safely monitor premises from a control room
  • Provide CCTV evidence to Police to secure a prosecution

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